December 24th, 2012

(Source: s-exploding)

Maths joke.

Maths joke.

(Source: schrodinger-is-in-the-box)

December 23rd, 2012
Merry Christmas! :)

Merry Christmas! :)

(Source: chemist-in-action, via sciencejokes)

scienceisbeauty:

The Periodic Table Of Super-Powers. Bizarrely useful, now for instance Superman comes out as OAFSISpVxVhSn and Batman becomes ORcLsArGDcFmKfV.
Via Comics Alliance.

scienceisbeauty:

The Periodic Table Of Super-Powers. Bizarrely useful, now for instance Superman comes out as OAFSISpVxVhSn and Batman becomes ORcLsArGDcFmKfV.

Via Comics Alliance.

October 2nd, 2012
Beautiful!

mrdiv:

retro_sphere

Beautiful!

mrdiv:

retro_sphere

(via proofmathisbeautiful)

Pokemon in maths exam

Pokemon in maths exam

(Source: chocolate-and-shots, via sciencejokes)

Best physics exam ever. 

Best physics exam ever. 

(via sciencejokes)

matthen:

A big red mouse tries to escape 10 cats of varying speed. The cats are silly, and always run directly towards the mouse, so while the cat which can run at the mouse’s pace can catch it, the slower ones end up tracing out interesting squircular shapes.  [Recently I explained the natural definition of a curve is to give its angle for a given length drawn so far. The curve of a cat’s motion is always angled to the mouse, whose position is easy to work out if you know the length of the cat’s curve drawn so far (as they both travel at constant speeds).  This gives useful definition for the curves, which are solved and plotted for the animation.] [more] [code]

matthen:

A big red mouse tries to escape 10 cats of varying speed. The cats are silly, and always run directly towards the mouse, so while the cat which can run at the mouse’s pace can catch it, the slower ones end up tracing out interesting squircular shapes.  [Recently I explained the natural definition of a curve is to give its angle for a given length drawn so far. The curve of a cat’s motion is always angled to the mouse, whose position is easy to work out if you know the length of the cat’s curve drawn so far (as they both travel at constant speeds).  This gives useful definition for the curves, which are solved and plotted for the animation.] [more] [code]

prostheticknowledge:

How Computer-Generated Animations Were Made, Circa 1964 

Interesting computer-made presentation demonstrating the earlier concepts of computer graphics. It is 15 minutes long, silent, and very slow moving, but from a digital literacy perspective, essential watching:

This film explains how the computer scientists and mathematicians at Bell Labs created early computer graphics films, like most (though not all) of these films, made by Bell Labs employees E.E. Zajac, A. Michael Noll, Ken Knowlton, Frank Sinden, and many others.

This film, A Computer Technique For the Production of Animated Movies, from 1964, gives the basics on the process, from Ken Knowlton’s BEFLIX programming language for a raster-scan (bitmap) output, to the hardware details (IBM 7094 mainframe, Stromberg-Carlson 4020 microfilm printer). 

Source

(via )

Haha - amazing effort

Haha - amazing effort

(via themathkid)

matthen:

James Watt’s work on developing the steam engine lead to the discovery of what are now called Watt’s curves and linkages.  The animation above shows how they are constructed from linking a fixed radius to another with a rod. I tweaked the lengths here to make a lovely heart. With different lengths it is possible to make sections of the red curve almost exactly straight. Watt was able to use this to double the power of a beam engine, and nowadays this is used in the suspension systems of some cars. [more] [more2] [code]

matthen:

James Watt’s work on developing the steam engine lead to the discovery of what are now called Watt’s curves and linkages.  The animation above shows how they are constructed from linking a fixed radius to another with a rod. I tweaked the lengths here to make a lovely heart. With different lengths it is possible to make sections of the red curve almost exactly straight. Watt was able to use this to double the power of a beam engine, and nowadays this is used in the suspension systems of some cars. [more] [more2] [code]

(via themathkid)

Woah this puzzle looks fun ;)

(via themathkid)

September 9th, 2012
I want this…

I want this…

(via themathkid)

intothecontinuum:

Mathematica code:
G[X_, Y_, Z_, S_, p_, q_, r_, a_, b_, c_, N_, e_, t_, PR_, IS_] :=Graphics[ Table[    Disk[     {X*Cos[a (e*t + n)*2 Pi/N + p], Y*Cos[b (e*t + n)*2 Pi/N + q]},      Z*Cos[c (e*t + n)*2 Pi/N + r*t*2 Pi] + S], {n, 1, N}],PlotRange -> PR, ImageSize -> IS]Manipulate[ G[.75, 1, .02, .03, 0, Pi/2, .04, 3, 1, 4, 100, .08, t,   {{-.857, .857}, {-1.2, 1.2}}, 500],{t, 1, 25, 1}]

intothecontinuum:

Mathematica code:

G[X_, Y_, Z_, S_, p_, q_, r_, a_, b_, c_, N_, e_, t_, PR_, IS_] :=
Graphics[
Table[
Disk[
{X*Cos[a (e*t + n)*2 Pi/N + p], Y*Cos[b (e*t + n)*2 Pi/N + q]},
Z*Cos[c (e*t + n)*2 Pi/N + r*t*2 Pi] + S],
{n, 1, N}],
PlotRange -> PR, ImageSize -> IS]

Manipulate[
G[.75, 1, .02, .03, 0, Pi/2, .04, 3, 1, 4, 100, .08, t,
{{-.857, .857}, {-1.2, 1.2}}, 500],
{t, 1, 25, 1}]

(via proofmathisbeautiful)

c86:

Hackpen Hill, Broad Hinton, Wiltshire, England | Reported 26th August

Probably the last crop circle of the 2012 season, one of 68 recorded in the UK this year. It should still be available to visit until Sunday before harvesting

(via proofmathisbeautiful)